41ST CHRONICLE – GRACE ON THE MESOPOTAMIAN GODDESS

Saturday, November 19, 2011
[c] (See: 2ND CHRONICLE)
Frederick G. Celani, – Relater.

Grace created the 39TH through 44TH Chronicle’s as teachable moments. Each of these six “Goddess Chronicles” are designed to re-introduce COG’s to the undeniable truth’s of existence, that everything in the universe (infinite) is the realm of the Goddess. The Goddess Chronicles are complex. In the abridged Chronicles (See: 1ST and 2nd Chronicle’s for abridgment explanation) i have condensed many hours of conversations and hundreds of pages of notes into short form Chronicles, which i will expand in the future.

At this stage Grace invites you to exercise your own Free Will and urges you to conduct your own research. Simply google any of the names Grace references in the Goddess Chronicles to learn about the truth, that the universe (infinite) is now, and has always been under the total control and sole dominion of a woman.

Grace discussed the historical Goddess in Chronicle 39 and Greek Goddess in Chronicle 40. This Chronicle (41) is focused on the Goddess legends of mesopotamia. The mesopotamian legends are perhaps the most interesting as mesopotamia was home to the world’s earliest civilizations.  Historically mesopotamia was known as the land between the rivers, (tigris and euphrates) with cities dating back to 4000 b.c.

Grace teaches that mesopotamia had a strong agricultural and mercantile economy and a rich religious life based upon the Goddess Ishtar, (Inanna). Grace teaches that close study of the hebrew bible, will reveal that it is based upon mesopotamian legend. Sumeria, which later became mesopotamia recorded it’s legends in cuneiform on clay tablets. It is in mesopotamia that the first creation legends are found in the enuma elish, which contains the legend of cosmogony the story of the universe.

Grace teaches that mesopotamia also gave COG’s the great legend of gilgamesh, the legendary king of urak (a.k.a. erech). It is the gilgamesh adventures, including the slaying of  humbaba, guardian of the forest that brings into direct focus the power of the Goddess.

Grace teaches that it is gilgamesh who must go to the Goddess Siduri-Sabitu, to ask for permission to seek out the ferryman ursanapi, who then transported gilgamesh across the waters of death for a meeting with  utnapishtim, (the mesopotamian noah) in gilgamesh’s search for the branch of immortal life, (fountain of youth).

Grace instructs me that when i teach the Bliss Fellowship Seminar’s (BFS Conventions) i am to fully set out the entire history of all the Goddesses, including those of mesopotamia and in the meantime invites all COG’s to exercise their own Free Will, by engaging in self study of the Goddess proofs. Grace teaches that the following Goddesses are the primary mesopotamian Goddesses to study.

The Goddesses listed below are set out in their mesopotamian (sumerian) names, with the additional names used for these same Goddesses in the akkadian, babylonian or assyrian legends set forth in parenthesis.

Inanna, (Ishtar) Goddess of love and war.

Ki, (Ninhursag) supreme earth Goddess also known historically as “Mother Earth”.

Siduri, Goddess of the vine, (See: Graces teaching above wherein gilgamesh must come to this Goddess for permission to cross the waters of death).

COG’s who take the time to attend future BSF Conventions or engage in Free Will, self study on the web will ascertain that the Goddess (a.k.a. Grace or those consorts Grace appointed as her relaters here on earth) controlled the earth for all time. The male dominated organized religions have suppressed the Goddess for thousands of years. The present surge in new age study, and future BFS Conventions will return the Goddess to her rightful place.

So say Grace.

Grace be with you.

Advertisements

About Fred Celani

Reg.No: 06691-026 MDC Brooklyn Box 329002 Unit 4 North Brooklyn, NY 11232 FredCelani@Lavabit.com
This entry was posted in Chronicles of Grace. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s